About Us

ORGANIZATION

The Department of Veterans Services (DVS) is organized into six service delivery sections – benefits, veterans education, care centers, veterans cemeteries, the Virginia War Memorial, and the Virginia Wounded Warrior Program. Three citizen boards work closely with the agency to support the effective delivery of services to Virginia’s veterans – the Board of Veterans Services, the Joint Leadership Council of Veterans Service Organizations, and the Veterans Services Foundation.

Benefits Services

Benefits Services assists veterans of the armed forces and their dependents in accessing federal and state veterans benefits. DVS operates 22 benefits services offices throughout the Commonwealth where veterans and their dependents receive free assistance in developing and filing claims for federal veterans benefits. This section also certifies eligibility for the Virginia Military Survivors and Dependents Education Program.

Veterans Education

The State Approving Agency for Veterans Education and Training (SAA) approves educational programs offered by institutions and establishments operating in Virginia so that eligible veterans and their dependents may enroll and receive financial assistance from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs while pursuing an approved educational program. The SAA approves educational programs at colleges/universities, technical/trade schools, licensing/ certification programs, and on-the-job training/apprenticeship programs.

Cemeteries

Virginia’s state veterans cemeteries provide burial and perpetual care services to veterans and eligible dependents. The Virginia Veterans Cemetery in Amelia is a 129-acre facility.  The Albert G. Horton, Jr. Memorial Veterans Cemetery in Suffolk is a 73-acre facility.  The Southwest Virginia Veterans Cemetery in Dublin is an 80-acre facility.

Care Centers

The Virginia Veterans Care Center (VVCC), located adjacent to the Salem Veterans Affairs Medical Center, provides state-of-the-art long-term health care for up to 240 veterans. Of the facility’s 240 beds, 180 are dedicated to skilled nursing care, including 60 dedicated to the care of Alzheimer’s patients. There are 60 beds serving assisted-living (domiciliary care) residents. The VVCC provides on-site physical therapy, occupational and speech therapies, and podiatry care, as well as many other ancillary health care services. The care center also offers amenities such as a wheelchair accessible nature trail and deck, library, chapel, solariums, and barbershop.

The Sitter & Barfoot Veterans Care Center (SBVCC), located on the campus of the McGuire Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) in Richmond, features 160 single-occupancy rooms. The care center has two 60-bed skilled nursing care units and one 40-bed Alzheimer’s/dementia care unit. All beds are certified for both Medicare and Medicaid. The facility is also certified by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. The facility provides physical, occupational, and speech therapy, as well as therapeutic recreation, social and spiritual activities, and other amenities such as an on-site pharmacy, a fully equipped barber and beauty shop, activity and game rooms, resident lounges in each nursing unit, courtyards, and an outdoor walking trail. Veterans may be admitted as long-term residents or on a short-term basis for rehabilitation as they transition from hospital care to home.

Virginia wAR MEMORIAL

The Virginia War Memorial is the Commonwealth of Virginia’s monument to honor the memory of Virginia’s men and women who demonstrated a willingness to serve and fight to defend our way of life from World War II to the present; and through its Education Center to serves as the Center of Excellence for the Commonwealth in education of Virginian’s experience of war from the birth of our nation to the present. In its educational mission, the Virginia War Memorial will project a variety of internal and outreach programs, artifacts, research materials, Virginians at War documentaries, exhibitions, seminars, and ceremonies will be used to instill a living memorial to all citizens and citizen-warriors of the nation’s commitment to freedom.

Virginia Wounded Warrior Program

The Virginia Wounded Warrior Program is designed to provide timely supplemental behavioral health, rehabilitation services, and support to Virginia’s veterans, members of the Virginia National Guard, Virginia residents in the Armed Forces Reserves, and their family members, who are coping with the effects of combat/operational stress and other combat-related injuries resulting from their service and sacrifice in the U.S. Armed Forces. The Program focuses on traumatic brain injuries and post traumatic stress disorders and operates in conjunction with the Virginia Department of Mental Health, Mental Retardation, and Substance Abuse Services and the Virginia Department of Rehabilitation Services. The Program will be administered through three regional directors working closely with existing local Community Services Boards.

CITIZEN BOARDS

The Department of Veterans Services works closely with three citizen boards to deliver effective services to Virginia’s veterans.

Board of Veterans Services

The Board is responsible for formulating policies, developing procedures, reviewing agency budget submissions, and making recommendations for the efficient and effective delivery of veterans’ services. It also studies topics affecting the welfare of Virginia’s veterans.

Joint Leadership Council of Veterans Service Organizations

The Council consists of representatives of the majority of veterans service organizations in the Commonwealth. It advises DVS on matters of concern to veterans and their families. The Council is active in identifying veterans’ needs and advocating in support of veterans issues that may be remedied through appropriate legislation or by other means.

Veterans Services Foundation

The Foundation Board of Trustees is responsible for oversight and administration of the Veterans Services Fund, distribution of funds to veterans services and programs, and seeking additional sources of revenue and other resources to support the viability of the Fund. Government resources alone cannot fully meet the needs of Virginia’s veterans, and the Commonwealth anticipates that Virginia citizens will want to help our veterans.

The Foundation is available to receive contributions to support veterans services. It is an independent state agency that supports the Department of Veterans Services. The Foundation is eligible to receive tax-deductible donations under Internal Revenue Service Section 170 (c) and Code of Virginia Section 2.2-2719. Contributions are placed in the Veterans Services Fund and cannot revert to the Commonwealth’s General Fund.

LEADERSHIP

About Commissioner John L. Newby II

Commissioner Paul Galanti

John L. Newby II serves as Commissioner of the Virginia Department of Veterans Services.

Son of a retired Army Sergeant Major from Isle of Wight County, Commissioner Newby served in Iraq as an aviator aboard the Boeing B-1B Lancer strategic bomber and commanded an Air Force special operations forward air control unit supporting the U.S. Army’s 3rd and 7th Special Forces Groups (Airborne). Following his military service, Commissioner Newby served as an attorney at private sector law firms and an international defense contractor. He also served as a member of former Senator Jim Webb’s Service Academy Selection Board.

In January of 2014, Commissioner Newby was appointed to serve as Virginia’s Deputy Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs. In this role, he assisted the Secretary with oversight of all veteran-related issues in Virginia, and supported Governor McAuliffe’s initiatives focused on relationship building with our nation’s military services and our active duty military communities.

Commissioner Newby received his commission and Bachelor of Science degree from the United States Air Force Academy, and earned his Juris Doctor from the University of Virginia School of Law. He, his wife Reba and daughter Jillian reside in Richmond, Virginia.

 

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